Discussion:
Oil senator blocks honor for Rachel Carson
(too old to reply)
Sid9
2007-05-23 01:41:36 UTC
Permalink
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
05/22/2007 @ 6:57 pm
Filed by Michael Roston


A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.

"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.

Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that Carson
was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted 'junk
science.'

"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims about
DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions," said
spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in the
developing world, particularly children under five, died because governments
bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it in language
the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had deadly
consequences."

One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold' seeks
to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.

"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and pioneer
in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial of her
birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators Barbara
Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson spent much
of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and Democrat Joe
Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.

Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT] in
1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."

The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."

Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.

"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The U.S.
and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century to
eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance for
use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."

Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.

"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.

She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."

Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.

"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point to
the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with human
health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today in the
study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody, who
directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that identifies
links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer.

Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.

Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research and
favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW STORY
in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some positive
benefits from Silent Spring.

"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'

"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution, and
there's value in that," he added.

Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.

"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what Rachel
Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further radical
complaints or actions against it, because if things had been allowed to go
on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the future," she
explained

But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of the
resolution.
Jack Granade
2007-05-23 01:49:55 UTC
Permalink
Great for Senator Coburn for blocking this liberal nonsense. There are more
important problems to tackle.
jack g.
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental
causes is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would
honor the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent
Spring, RAW STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan
group of Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland
on the occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson
on the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office
after her in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at
Senator Tom Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that
Carson was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted
'junk science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims
about DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions,"
said spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in
the developing world, particularly children under five, died because
governments bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it
in language the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had
deadly consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold'
seeks to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and
pioneer in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial
of her birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators
Barbara Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson
spent much of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and
Democrat Joe Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT]
in 1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The
U.S. and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century
to eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance
for use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point
to the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with
human health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today
in the study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody,
who directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that
identifies links between the environment and women's health, especially
breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research
and favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW
STORY in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some
positive benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution,
and there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what
Rachel Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further
radical complaints or actions against it, because if things had been
allowed to go on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the
future," she explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of
the resolution.
Miles Long
2007-05-23 02:40:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Granade
Great for Senator Coburn for blocking this liberal nonsense. There are more
important problems to tackle.
jack g.
Well sure. Your personal proof of the dumbing down of America,
for example... <snicker>

Miles "Education: Kryptonite to the Right" Long
Post by Jack Granade
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental
causes is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would
honor the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent
Spring, RAW STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan
group of Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland
on the occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson
on the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office
after her in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at
Senator Tom Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that
Carson was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted
'junk science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims
about DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions,"
said spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in
the developing world, particularly children under five, died because
governments bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it
in language the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had
deadly consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold'
seeks to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and
pioneer in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial
of her birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators
Barbara Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson
spent much of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and
Democrat Joe Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT]
in 1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The
U.S. and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century
to eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance
for use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point
to the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with
human health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today
in the study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody,
who directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that
identifies links between the environment and women's health, especially
breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research
and favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW
STORY in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some
positive benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution,
and there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what
Rachel Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further
radical complaints or actions against it, because if things had been
allowed to go on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the
future," she explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of
the resolution.
mcs
2007-05-23 04:31:13 UTC
Permalink
great to kill planet some more. what else is left? Mean spirited people
killing its own citizens as it is. more violent crime then many countries
put together where ? In our cities. where pollution in the ne is making me
sick automatically yes you heard it right and if others new how they got
sick it would be the biggest mass murder in history of the US for energy..
right now going on while we poison the planet and pay thru our teeth for oil
and pay for our own poisoning. Many areas do get cleaner energy at the
expense of people who don't , no one is protecting me. I get disabled and
lucky if a caseworker who sees tens of thousands of people is lucky to ever
get to me . fk the murdreers I never hurt anyone
Post by Jack Granade
Great for Senator Coburn for blocking this liberal nonsense. There are
more important problems to tackle.
jack g.
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author
of Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental
causes is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that
would honor the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book
Silent Spring, RAW STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a
bipartisan group of Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania
and Maryland on the occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson
on the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office
after her in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at
Senator Tom Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President
Al Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that
Carson was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted
'junk science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims
about DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other
contributions," said spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY.
"Millions of people in the developing world, particularly children under
five, died because governments bought into Carson's junk science claims
about DDT. To put it in language the Left understands, her 'intelligence'
was wrong and it had deadly consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold'
seeks to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and
pioneer in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial
of her birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators
Barbara Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson
spent much of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and
Democrat Joe Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including
birds," and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific
panel whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical
[DDT] in 1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization
against insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his
website. "The U.S. and western European countries all used DDT in the
mid-20th century to eliminate malaria from their territories, but then
banned the substance for use by poor countries today to combat their
number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts
of pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of
the environment are important, and that we need to have better a
relationship with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point
to the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with
human health and I think that's a very key insight that is important
today in the study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie
Brody, who directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that
identifies links between the environment and women's health, especially
breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had
beneficial results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research
and favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW
STORY in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some
positive benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution,
and there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what
Rachel Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further
radical complaints or actions against it, because if things had been
allowed to go on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the
future," she explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of
the resolution.
David R KE®©™
2007-05-23 04:57:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Granade
Great for Senator Coburn for blocking this liberal nonsense. There are
more important problems to tackle.
jack g.
True, like how to rid Americans and America of vermin like you,bush, and
this ignorant hillbilly fuckup senator
chatnoir
2007-05-23 13:12:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Granade
Great for Senator Coburn for blocking this liberal nonsense. There are more
important problems to tackle.
jack g.
http://scienceblogs.com/deltoid/2007/05/this_week_in_the_unending_war.php#more


This Week in the Unending War on Rachel Carson
Category: DDT
Posted on: May 21, 2007 1:48 PM, by Tim Lambert

Glenn Reynolds approvingly quotes Rich Karlgaard's ill-informed
comments on Rachel Carson:

FORBES' RICH KARLGAARD ASKS how many people died because of Rachel
Carson?

Buried in paragraph 27, and paraphrasing the Congressman, The
Washington Post concedes that "numerous" deaths might have been
prevented by DDT.

Let's stop here. Any curious reader would ask, Just how "numerous" is
numerous? Wouldn't you ask that question? The Post never asks that
question. Why?

Because the answer devastates Rachel Carson and her followers.
According to these CDC figures, malaria kills more than 800,000
children under age five every year.

Every year, 800,000 small children die from malaria, a disease once
nearly eradicated. Ponder that.

And all The Washington Post can say is "numerous?"

That's scandalous.

The answer is that many lives have been saved because of Rachel Carson
and it's scandalous the way Reynolds and Karlgard mislead their
readers.

Because of Carson, the agricultural use of DDT was banned, but not the
anti-malarial use of DDT and it has continued to be used to this day.
You can buy it from Yorkool Chemical:

In the past several years, we supplied DDT 75% WDP to Madagascar,
Ethiopia, Eritrea, Sudan, South Africa, Namibia, Solomon Island, Papua
New Guinea, Algeria, Thailand, Myanmar for Malaria Control project,
and won a good reputation from WHO and relevant countries' government.

And banning the agricultural use of DDT saved lives by slowing the
development of resistance. Furthermore this is exactly the case Carson
made in Silent Spring, warning that overuse would destroy the
effectiveness of insecticides:

No responsible person contends that insect-borne disease should be
ignored. The question that has now urgently presented itself is
whether it is either wise or responsible to attack the problem by
methods that are rapidly making it worse. The world has heard much of
the triumphant war against disease through the control of insect
vectors of infection, but it has heard little of the other side of the
story - the defeats, the short-lived triumphs that now strongly
support the alarming view that the insect enemy has been made actually
stronger by our efforts. Even worse, we may have destroyed our very
means of fighting. ...

What is the measure of this setback? The list of resistant species now
includes practically all of the insect groups of medical
importance. ... Malaria programmes are threatened by resistance among
mosquitoes. ...

Practical advice should be 'Spray as little as you possibly can'
rather than 'Spray to the limit of your capacity' ..., Pressure on the
pest population should always be as slight as possible.

Karlgaard is also wrong to claim that malaria was almost eradicated.
It was almost eradicated in some places like Sri Lanka, but then
returned with a vengeance, not because DDT was banned (again, it
wasn't) but because mosquitoes developed resistance to DDT.

Update: Steven D tried to educate Reynolds on DDT and malaria, without
much effect
----

Check out the comments also!
Post by Jack Granade
Republican environmental critic blocks honors forRachelCarson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental
causes is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would
honor the life ofRachelCarson, author of the well-known book Silent
Spring, RAW STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan
group of Senators fromCarson'shome-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland
on the occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honorRachelCarson
on the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office
after her in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at
Senator Tom Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that
Carsonwas undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted
'junk science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harmCarson'sjunk science claims
about DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions,"
said spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in
the developing world, particularly children under five, died because
governments bought intoCarson'sjunk science claims about DDT. To put it
in language the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had
deadly consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold'
seeks to mark the 100th birthday ofCarson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life ofRachelCarson, a scientist, writer, and
pioneer in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial
of her birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators
Barbara Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, whereCarson
spent much of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and
Democrat Joe Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT]
in 1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes thatCarson'sbook "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The
U.S. and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century
to eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance
for use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of theRachelCarsonCouncil, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrateCarson'slife.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachelalso pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY thatCarson'sscientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point
to the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with
human health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today
in the study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody,
who directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that
identifies links between the environment and women's health, especially
breast cancer.
Even some critics ofCarson'swork recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality ofCarson'sscientific research
and favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW
STORY in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some
positive benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining thatCarsonhad
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution,
and there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from theRachelCarsonCouncil also suggested thatCarson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what
RachelCarsondid probably saved the pesticide industry from further
radical complaints or actions against it, because if things had been
allowed to go on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the
future," she explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of
the resolution.
Captain Compassion
2007-05-23 02:01:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Wonder how many deaths she's responsible for?

"It (malaria)causes disease in approximately 400 million people every
year and kills between one and three million people every year, mostly
young children in Sub-Saharan Africa."
Post by Sid9
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that Carson
was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted 'junk
science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims about
DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions," said
spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in the
developing world, particularly children under five, died because governments
bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it in language
the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had deadly
consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold' seeks
to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and pioneer
in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial of her
birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators Barbara
Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson spent much
of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and Democrat Joe
Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT] in
1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The U.S.
and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century to
eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance for
use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point to
the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with human
health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today in the
study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody, who
directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that identifies
links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research and
favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW STORY
in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some positive
benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution, and
there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what Rachel
Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further radical
complaints or actions against it, because if things had been allowed to go
on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the future," she
explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of the
resolution.
--
There may come a time when the CO2 police will wander the earth telling
the poor and the dispossed how many dung chips they can put on their
cook fires. -- Captain Compassion.

Wherever I go it will be well with me, for it was well with me here, not
on account of the place, but of my judgments which I shall carry away
with me, for no one can deprive me of these; on the contrary, they alone
are my property, and cannot be taken away, and to possess them suffices
me wherever I am or whatever I do. -- EPICTETUS

Celibacy in healthy human beings is a form of
insanity. -- Captain Compassion

"Civilization is the interval between Ice Ages." -- Will Durant.

Joseph R. Darancette
***@NOSPAMcharter.net
Server 13
2007-05-23 16:21:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Captain Compassion
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Wonder how many deaths she's responsible for?
lol Of course you do, of course you do. (pat pat)
GW Chimpzilla's Eye-Rack Neocon Utopia
2007-05-23 18:53:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Captain Compassion
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Wonder how many deaths she's responsible for?
"It (malaria)causes disease in approximately 400 million people every
year and kills between one and three million people every year, mostly
young children in Sub-Saharan Africa."
I wonder how many deaths DDT is responsible for?

One out of many studies found that DDT exposure in pregnant mothers makes their
kids stoopit -- turns them into Republicans:

"A 2006 study finds that even low-level concentrations of DDT in serum from the
umbilical cord at birth were associated with a decrease in cognitive skills at
4 years of age."

<http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/164/10/955>
--
There are only two kinds of Republicans: Millionaires and fools.
Jack Granade
2007-05-23 20:15:34 UTC
Permalink
Another liberal spam. When is Congress going to get down to business? They
still must be at war with the Bush Administration. Sad....
jack g.
Post by GW Chimpzilla's Eye-Rack Neocon Utopia
Post by Captain Compassion
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Wonder how many deaths she's responsible for?
"It (malaria)causes disease in approximately 400 million people every
year and kills between one and three million people every year, mostly
young children in Sub-Saharan Africa."
I wonder how many deaths DDT is responsible for?
One out of many studies found that DDT exposure in pregnant mothers makes their
"A 2006 study finds that even low-level concentrations of DDT in serum from the
umbilical cord at birth were associated with a decrease in cognitive skills at
4 years of age."
<http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/164/10/955>
--
There are only two kinds of Republicans: Millionaires and fools.
GW Chimpzilla's Eye-Rack Neocon Utopia
2007-05-23 22:40:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jack Granade
Another liberal spam. When is Congress going to get down to business? They
still must be at war with the Bush Administration. Sad....
jack g.
Another conservative spam. When will Republicans stop obstructing Congress? THey
must still be at war with America. Pathetic.
Post by Jack Granade
Post by GW Chimpzilla's Eye-Rack Neocon Utopia
Post by Captain Compassion
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Wonder how many deaths she's responsible for?
"It (malaria)causes disease in approximately 400 million people every
year and kills between one and three million people every year, mostly
young children in Sub-Saharan Africa."
I wonder how many deaths DDT is responsible for?
One out of many studies found that DDT exposure in pregnant mothers makes their
"A 2006 study finds that even low-level concentrations of DDT in serum from the
umbilical cord at birth were associated with a decrease in cognitive skills at
4 years of age."
<http://aje.oxfordjournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/164/10/955>
--
There are only two kinds of Republicans: Millionaires and fools.
--
There are only two kinds of Republicans: Millionaires and fools.
Ronald 'More-More' Moshki
2007-05-23 02:38:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Captain Compassion
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Wonder how many deaths she's responsible for?
"It (malaria)causes disease in approximately 400 million people every
year and kills between one and three million people every year, mostly
young children in Sub-Saharan Africa."
Post by Sid9
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that Carson
was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted 'junk
science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims about
DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions," said
spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in the
developing world, particularly children under five, died because governments
bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it in language
the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had deadly
consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold' seeks
to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and pioneer
in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial of her
birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators Barbara
Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson spent much
of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and Democrat Joe
Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT] in
1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The U.S.
and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century to
eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance for
use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point to
the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with human
health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today in the
study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody, who
directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that identifies
links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research and
favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW STORY
in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some positive
benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution, and
there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what Rachel
Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further radical
complaints or actions against it, because if things had been allowed to go
on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the future," she
explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of the
resolution.
--
There may come a time when the CO2 police will wander the earth telling
the poor and the dispossed how many dung chips they can put on their
cook fires. -- Captain Compassion.
Wherever I go it will be well with me, for it was well with me here, not
on account of the place, but of my judgments which I shall carry away
with me, for no one can deprive me of these; on the contrary, they alone
are my property, and cannot be taken away, and to possess them suffices
me wherever I am or whatever I do. -- EPICTETUS
Celibacy in healthy human beings is a form of
insanity. -- Captain Compassion
"Civilization is the interval between Ice Ages." -- Will Durant.
Joseph R. Darancette
Captain Shtinkee gets every word and thought from the
Cape Girardeau Coward.
Ronald 'More-More' Moshki
2007-05-23 02:38:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Captain Compassion
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Wonder how many deaths she's responsible for?
"It (malaria)causes disease in approximately 400 million people every
year and kills between one and three million people every year, mostly
young children in Sub-Saharan Africa."
Post by Sid9
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that Carson
was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted 'junk
science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims about
DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions," said
spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in the
developing world, particularly children under five, died because governments
bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it in language
the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had deadly
consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold' seeks
to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and pioneer
in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial of her
birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators Barbara
Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson spent much
of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and Democrat Joe
Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT] in
1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The U.S.
and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century to
eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance for
use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point to
the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with human
health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today in the
study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody, who
directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that identifies
links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research and
favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW STORY
in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some positive
benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution, and
there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what Rachel
Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further radical
complaints or actions against it, because if things had been allowed to go
on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the future," she
explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of the
resolution.
--
There may come a time when the CO2 police will wander the earth telling
the poor and the dispossed how many dung chips they can put on their
cook fires. -- Captain Compassion.
Wherever I go it will be well with me, for it was well with me here, not
on account of the place, but of my judgments which I shall carry away
with me, for no one can deprive me of these; on the contrary, they alone
are my property, and cannot be taken away, and to possess them suffices
me wherever I am or whatever I do. -- EPICTETUS
Celibacy in healthy human beings is a form of
insanity. -- Captain Compassion
"Civilization is the interval between Ice Ages." -- Will Durant.
Joseph R. Darancette
Captain Shtinkee gets every word and thought from the
Cape Girardeau Coward.
Ronald 'More-More' Moshki
2007-05-23 02:38:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Captain Compassion
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Wonder how many deaths she's responsible for?
"It (malaria)causes disease in approximately 400 million people every
year and kills between one and three million people every year, mostly
young children in Sub-Saharan Africa."
Post by Sid9
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that Carson
was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted 'junk
science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims about
DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions," said
spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in the
developing world, particularly children under five, died because governments
bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it in language
the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had deadly
consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold' seeks
to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and pioneer
in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial of her
birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators Barbara
Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson spent much
of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and Democrat Joe
Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT] in
1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The U.S.
and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century to
eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance for
use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point to
the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with human
health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today in the
study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody, who
directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that identifies
links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research and
favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW STORY
in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some positive
benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution, and
there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what Rachel
Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further radical
complaints or actions against it, because if things had been allowed to go
on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the future," she
explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of the
resolution.
--
There may come a time when the CO2 police will wander the earth telling
the poor and the dispossed how many dung chips they can put on their
cook fires. -- Captain Compassion.
Wherever I go it will be well with me, for it was well with me here, not
on account of the place, but of my judgments which I shall carry away
with me, for no one can deprive me of these; on the contrary, they alone
are my property, and cannot be taken away, and to possess them suffices
me wherever I am or whatever I do. -- EPICTETUS
Celibacy in healthy human beings is a form of
insanity. -- Captain Compassion
"Civilization is the interval between Ice Ages." -- Will Durant.
Joseph R. Darancette
Captain Shtinkee gets every word and thought from the
Cape Girardeau Coward.
Roger
2007-05-23 04:45:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental
causes is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would
honor the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent
Spring, RAW STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan
group of Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland
on the occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson
on the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office
after her in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at
Senator Tom Coburn's (R-OK) website.
From

Coburn Praises Senate Passage of Terry Schiavo Bill

March 17, 2005

(WASHINGTON, D.C.) – U.S. Senator Tom Coburn, M.D. (R-OK), a practicing
physician, today applauded his colleagues for passing a bill to prevent the
death by starvation of Terry Schiavo, a Florida woman on life support. A
Florida court declared recently that Schiavo’s feeding tubes can be removed
Friday at the request of her husband even though Schiavo never consented to
the removal of her feeding tubes and her parents oppose that course of
action.

“As a practicing physician, I have dedicated much of my life to protecting
the sanctity of life at all of its stages. Taking innocent life at any stage
is cruel and immoral. I’m proud that the Senate had the courage to be a
voice for one woman who cannot speak for herself but deserves the right to
choose life,” Dr. Coburn said.

S. 653 reaffirms the essential 14th Amendment “due process” right. The bill
prevents the unlawful killing of incapacitated persons who, while having
capacity, did not grant written permission for others to withhold or
withdrawal food or fluids in the event they became incapacitated. Convicted
murderers and other criminals already have this right.

“This bill merely demands that our courts give the same rights to
incapacitated persons that are currently enjoyed by common criminals,” Dr.
Coburn said. “I urge my colleagues in the House of Representatives to
consider and pass this bill at their earliest opportunity.”


From
http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/06/15/AR2005061500512.html

Terri Schiavo suffered severe, irreversible brain damage that left that
organ discolored and scarred, shriveled to half its normal size, and damaged
in nearly all its regions, including the one responsible for vision,
according to an autopsy report released yesterday.

Although the meticulous postmortem examination could not determine the
mental state of the Florida woman, who died March 31 after a judicial and
legislative battle over her "right to die," it did establish the permanence
of her physical condition.

Schiavo's brain damage "was irreversible . . . no amount of treatment or
rehabilitation would have reversed" it, said Jon R. Thogmartin, the
pathologist in Florida's sixth judicial district who performed the autopsy
and announced his findings at a news conference in Largo, Fla.
Post by Sid9
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that
Carson was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted
'junk science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims
about DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions,"
said spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in
the developing world, particularly children under five, died because
governments bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it
in language the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had
deadly consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold'
seeks to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and
pioneer in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial
of her birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators
Barbara Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson
spent much of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and
Democrat Joe Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT]
in 1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The
U.S. and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century
to eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance
for use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point
to the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with
human health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today
in the study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody,
who directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that
identifies links between the environment and women's health, especially
breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research
and favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW
STORY in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some
positive benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution,
and there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what
Rachel Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further
radical complaints or actions against it, because if things had been
allowed to go on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the
future," she explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of
the resolution.
P.Henery
2007-05-23 13:29:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sid9
Republican environmental critic blocks honors for Rachel Carson, author of
Silent Spring
Filed by Michael Roston
A Republican Senator known for his criticism of various environmental causes
is single-handedly holding up two bills in the US Senate that would honor
the life of Rachel Carson, author of the well-known book Silent Spring, RAW
STORY has learned. The bills were introduced by a bipartisan group of
Senators from Carson's home-states of Pennsylvania and Maryland on the
occasion of the centennial of her birthday on May 27.
"This week, Dr. Coburn blocked two bills intended to honor Rachel Carson on
the 100th anniversary of her birth (one bill to name a post office after her
in PA, and a resolution honoring her)," said a press release at Senator Tom
Coburn's (R-OK) website.
Coburn is perhaps best known for his clashes with former Vice President Al
Gore and as a strong critic of the scientific basis for the claim that
global warming is caused by humans. He said through a spokesman that Carson
was undeserving of honor from Congress because she had promoted 'junk
science.'
"Dr. Coburn believes the tremendous harm Carson's junk science claims about
DDT did to the developing world overshadow her other contributions," said
spokesman John Hart in an e-mail to RAW STORY. "Millions of people in the
developing world, particularly children under five, died because governments
bought into Carson's junk science claims about DDT. To put it in language
the Left understands, her 'intelligence' was wrong and it had deadly
consequences."
One of the resolutions Coburn is blocking with a parliamentary 'hold' seeks
to mark the 100th birthday of Carson, who died in 1964.
"Congress honors the life of Rachel Carson, a scientist, writer, and pioneer
in the environmental movement, on the occasion of the centennial of her
birth," reads the resolution, which was introduced by Senators Barbara
Mikulsky and Ben Cardin, both Democrats of Maryland, where Carson spent much
of her life, and Senators Arlen Specter, a Republican, and Democrat Joe
Sestak, from Pennsylvania where she was born.
Their resolution recognizes Silent Spring for detailing "how synthetic
chemicals accumulate in water, soils, fish, and animals, including birds,"
and for pushing President John F. Kennedy to convene a scientific panel
whose findings led "to the domestic ban of the sale of the chemical [DDT] in
1972, an action that many credit with saving the bald eagle from
extinction."
The resolution also notes that Carson's book "is credited with helping to
launch the modern environmental movement."
Coburn's action is part of an ongoing scientific and public health
controversy over the use of the pesticide DDT, which the World Health
Organization recently approved for limited use in order to prevent the
spread of malaria in developing countries.
"This book was the catalyst in the deadly worldwide stigmatization against
insecticides, especially DDT," said Senator Coburn at his website. "The U.S.
and western European countries all used DDT in the mid-20th century to
eliminate malaria from their territories, but then banned the substance for
use by poor countries today to combat their number one health threat."
Dr. Diana Post, President of the Rachel Carson Council, was critical of
Coburn's message that there was no reason to celebrate Carson's life.
"It's very important today that she linked human health and the impacts of
pesticides on wildlife and plants and we know that today," Dr. Post
explained.
She added, "Rachel also pointed out to us that all of those aspects of the
environment are important, and that we need to have better a relationship
with the environment."
Another researcher also explained to RAW STORY that Carson's scientific
insights made her life deserving of celebration.
"She had important insights about the importance of interdisciplinary
approaches to environmental health, and she was one of the first to point to
the importance of linking the effect of pesticides on wildlife with human
health and I think that's a very key insight that is important today in the
study of endocrine disrupting compounds," argued Dr. Julie Brody, who
directs the Silent Spring Institute, a non-profit group that identifies
links between the environment and women's health, especially breast cancer.
Even some critics of Carson's work recognized that her book had beneficial
results.
Ronald Bailey, the science correspondent for the libertarian magazine
Reason, has been critical of the quality of Carson's scientific research and
favors the limited use of DDT for anti-malaria purposes. He told RAW STORY
in a phone interview Tuesday that there had nevertheless been some positive
benefits from Silent Spring.
"To a certain extent, she launched a movement based on bad science that
nevertheless had good results," Bailey argued, explaining that Carson had
essentially become a 'myth.'
"Let's face it, Americans needed to be alerted to problems of pollution, and
there's value in that," he added.
Dr. Post from the Rachel Carson Council also suggested that Carson
effectively saved the chemicals industry from itself.
"Many people, people who were not even anti-pesticide, said that what Rachel
Carson did probably saved the pesticide industry from further radical
complaints or actions against it, because if things had been allowed to go
on as they were, there would have been real trouble in the future," she
explained
But Senator Coburn's spokesman was adamant that he'd maintain his
parliamentary hold, which will prevent the casting of votes in favor of the
resolution.
Are all republicans as pig ignorant as this idiot?

What a stupid question, of course they are. Stupidity and an anti-science
bias is a prerequisites for being a republican.
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